Tag Archives: Rock Lee’s Springtime of Youth

Side Comments of the Month XI — Post-Holiday Catch-Up

Side Comments of the Month XI — Post-Holiday Catch-Up

Top row: books courtesy of the SF Book Review and some angels connected with the Young to Publishing Group. Bottom row: gifts from friends and Adam.

 

1. I got another haul of great books this past holiday season. I know I shouldn’t crow that friends and strangers send me books, but damn it, I like big books and I cannot lie. I had to part with so many books when I moved countries, so there’s a pleasure in rebuilding the collection.

These babies are now in my ever-growing Books To Read pile, which still is bigger than my new Books Finished and Now Must Review pile.

 

2. Last week, my family drove to the San Jose Tech Museum of Innovation to see the newly opened Star Wars: Where Science Meets Imagination

My nephews spent a lot of time waiting to sit in a real hovercraft while I had silly fun with  the “give your robot facial expressions” terminal. A family friend, Kevin, lamented that Hans Solo trapped in carbonite was nowhere to be seen, aside a ton of Boba Fett-related props. I didn’t even notice these omissions until he mentioned them because there were tons of other cool models. I especially liked Obi-Wan Kenobi’s sweet, scratched-up ride from Episode IV: A New Hope.

Since I was feeling queasy that day, I skipped The Millennium Falcon Experience. I didn’t want to risk throwing up midway. Lots of people at the exhibit were unable to see it too due to limited seats. If you’re planning to visit this exhibit—it runs until February—I highly recommend buying all your tickets online.

 

3. Adam and I just finished watching all the episodes of Rock Lee and his Ninja Pals (also known as Rock Lee’s Springtime of Youth). For a gag anime that features tons of cross-dressing and silliness, the last episode had at least three shifts in art styles during a furious fight scene. I think the animators wanted to outdo themselves for the finale! It was unexpected.

This show is the animated equivalent of cotton candy and Pop Tarts. I think I will miss it.

We have now returned to more serious, age-appropriate fare like Mushishi and Space Brothers. 

 

Side Comments for the Month

Side Comments for the Month

A month-long hiatus from my blog may speak of carelessness. Yet when caught up with the actual business of living, I sometimes find it impossible to sit down and write anything. When things move too fast, I feel the need to stay away from words to process what is happening to me.

I suppose you can call me an old-fashioned creature since I think it’s unnecessary to document every single moment. This is obviously contrary to the current behavior that incessant social media encourages. I’m mildly suspicious of people who can only have fun if they are posing for photos they will share right away with a thousand of their dearest friends on Facebook (or Twitter or Tumblr).

Then again, I’m also the person who once enjoyed a five-day silent retreat in a Jesuit seminary. Zero electronics permitted, no talking was allowed, and the accommodations were as spartan as a medieval monk’s cell. So yes, I suppose my distaste of over-sharing makes sense.

Maybe I’m just a crank and you should get off my lawn now.

The last three books I read for review.

Enough digressions, though. Here are some moments of my August and September:

1. I just finished reading Umberto Eco’s Inventing the Enemy and as silly as it seems, I totally forgot to mention what I thought about the title essay in my review. Do’h. Two hundred words is not enough space for anyone to wax poetic about one of their favorite theorists. In any case, the review should come out next month.

2. I had the pleasure of watching Batman Live with my nephews last weekend. Jesus H. Christ on a stick! I was expecting campy and the production exceeded all expectations on that score. It was like Adam West and Joel Schumacher had a secret love child and the poor thing was raised to be a Las Vegas showgirl.

If the show was aiming to be America’s next guilty pleasure, I think it succeeded well. The production has great visuals and props, a slick Batmobile, and a cheeky Poison Ivy. If you are easily infected by the enthusiasm of little children, it’s worth checking out. If not, I recommend boozing up before the show.

3. I’ve avoided Naruto for years, but Adam persuaded me to give its ridiculously cute spinoff a chance. Even if I know nothing about its parent material, Rock Lee’s Springtime of Youth is so silly it’s impossible not to laugh.

As a spin-off featuring chibis, it falls somewhere between The Melancholy of Haruhi-chan Suzumiya and Petit Eva: Evangelion@School. I suppose this genre only appeals to people with an immoderate sense of humor.

For people who like their manga with a slice of serious, three new chapters of Chico Umino’s Sangatsu No Lion were translated by fans when I wasn’t looking. As much as I adore Honey and Clover, I worry (rightly so?) that Sangatsu No Lion does not have the same mass appeal. The chances are slim, but I do hope they come out with an authorized English translation in the future.

. . .

I was going to write about my recent culinary adventures but that would take too much time. Another time, perhaps. Good food always deserves its own post.