Tag Archives: Everything Old is New Again

Side Comments for the Month IV

Side Comments for the Month IV

This represents a fraction of the number of books I've read and skimmed through over the past six months.

1. I might as well come out and say it—I’m writing my first genre novel. I started last October. National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo) has come and gone and yet I am still plugging away. I broke the 60,000 word barrier a month ago. Since my personal goal is at least 100,000 words, I have a long way to go.

This is a huge achievement for myself, as all my previous attempts at writing a full-length novel have failed. It’s easy to get discouraged with a personal project when one doesn’t have much self-confidence. I hope I just didn’t jinx myself with announcing this project!

Progress on this current project has been slow since I’ve been eagerly reading up on 19th century history, social customs, and language. As a reader, anachronisms are a major pet peeve of mine, so I think I am going completely overboard with research. I started a database of archaic words and idioms, in the hopes it gives my depiction of the era more credibility.

I actually suffered a bit of a setback recently. In the middle of fact-checking, I found out a natural calamity occurred in the neighborhood where my novel is set. It infuriated me that I hadn’t known about it before. After a few days of seething, I got back to work and decided to scrap two entire chapters. It’s gotten to the point I can almost laugh about it. At the time I really felt like banging my head against the wall.

Littlefinger and his kitten companion plot world domination via AU fanfics. Tumblr, fire your engines.

2. Adam and I have finished The Wire. Now, the next time I watch Game of Thrones I am going to be thinking, Damn it, Carcetti, you used to be my favorite political sleazeball, now you’re just the sleazeball that let me down.

When we started watching, Adam told me that Aidan Gillen acts more like Littlefinger in The Wire than he does in Game of Thrones. Perhaps this statement will not make sense to anyone who hasn’t read all the G.R.R. Martin novels yet, but really, it must be seen to be believed. (He certainly wins my vote for having the cutest animal companion on an IMDB page.)

Anyway, season five was amazing. The ending was absolutely satisfying—even the heart-breaking moments were good. Most of the loose ends were tied up, and almost everyone who mattered—whether it was in season one or season four—came back for one last scene, whether it was in a montage or a cameo. I know it’s a hipster thing to fawn all over The Wire but the show does have incredible writing and plotting. If I had watched it while it was airing on TV, I probably wouldn’t have had the patience to wait week after week. But seeing it marathon-style was a schooling in crime fiction writing.

And McNulty, I’m through talking to you. I rooted for you and you broke my little fangirl heart.

An Instragram snapshot of the exhibit.

3. Two weeks ago, I went downtown with my sister and our friend Mabel to check out the Terracotta Warriors exhibit at the Asian Art Museum.

The warriors they had on display were larger than I thought they would be. I do not think they are equal to the size of Chinese males living during that era. The warriors had large, beefy hands, too, which I found absurd. Nevertheless, everything else about them was impeccable, from their hairlines to their armor.

Some of the figures still had traces of their original finish. While there were colored simulations of how the warriors must have appeared when they were first made, I actually prefer them with their current muted shades. I grew up with that mental image, so the idea they were originally painted garish colors seems an anathema to me. I first encountered their original coloring in a recent copy of National Geographic. I haven’t gotten used to it.

Aside from the warriors, the exhibit also showcased many gold and brass ornaments, some still covered with thick layers of patina. The real stand-out among these objects were the horses.

Now, I do not consider myself a horse person. As a child, I didn’t go through that classic “I want a pony” stage. The last time I was impressed with a horse, it was a beautiful ceramic specimen I saw in the Art Institute of Chicago. But those terracotta horses. Jesus Christ! Their craftsmanship made my jaw drop. They are beautiful and majestic, and they looked great from every angle. If it was possible, I would prostrate myself in front of the artisans who made those horses and asked to be made their unpaid apprentice.

The exhibit ends on May 27, so there is still time to catch it. If you are in the area, please check it out. Go for the warriors, but stay for the horses. It might be easier than flying to China.

A promotional still for Parade's End. Courtesy of BBC and HBO.

4. I also finished watching HBO-BBC’s new mini-series, Parade’s End. I wonder if Benedict Cumberbatch will ever get tired of wearing top hats and World War I uniforms, because he seems so well-suited to the Edwardian era.

I’ve never read any Ford Madox Ford or Edith Wharton, but Parade’s End reminded me of Martin Scorsese’s The Age of Innocence (1993). The geographic and temporal settings differ but they both involve male leads who are just dying to commit adultery. Yet due to their own scruples and sense of honor, they can’t seem to bring themselves to do the deed.

The main difference may be the women they are thinking of cheating on. Newland Archer (Daniel Day-Lewis) is married to a saintly wife, while Christopher Tietjens (Benedict Cumberbatch) is shackled to the most manipulative, unfaithful bitch in London—she’s like a flapper version of Cersei Lannister. Have I said too much?

I enjoyed Parade’s End—it’s not for the impatient or those who dislike subtlety—but then I also happen to love that historical era. There’s not much in the way of fan service—Mr. Cumberbatch only takes off his shirt in the fifth episode—so if you are looking for cheap thrills, you need to look elsewhere.

For Cabin Pressure fans, there’s an added kick: Roger Allam (the guy who plays Douglas) shows up at a commanding officer in the last episodes. Every time he popped up on screen, I kept thinking, “why do I know that voice?” And then something on TV Tropes clarified it all for me. (Ye gads, Douglas outranks Martin once more! My mind is blown!) After that realization, all it needed was John Finnemore as a subservient batman. Now that would have turned Parade’s End into something incredibly surreal. I’m glad the BBC held off on that.

Music and Nostalgia at the Indie-Pino Underground Music Fest

Music and Nostalgia at the Indie-Pino Underground Music Fest

I wasn’t sure what to expect at the Indie-Pino: Underground Music Festival, which was held at the Yerba Buena Gardens yesterday. I should have never doubted that the Filipino-American community can manage to bring the temperature and mood of home to central San Francisco.

From the crazy old guy dancing Pandanggo sa Ilaw with imaginary candles to the summer heat beating down on our heads, it certainly felt like a world away. I can’t remember the last time I stood around and endured the heat so aimlessly, and yet so determinedly. It reminded me of a cross between annual Labor Day celebrations at the old Post Office to any street gig held at Cubao X. From the free-range children running around the performance area to the power accidentally cut off mid-song—these elements were familiar and oddly comforting.

A blurry cell phone photo of the Jack Lords Orchestra.

It would be unfair to all the bands if I pretended to have a professional opinion of their music. I have a tin ear at best; at worst I am a scourge of videoke machines. Years of listening to musically gifted friends debate about guitars and effects does not make it any easier to fake it.

Still, even someone as tone-deaf as myself was delighted with the Jack Lords Orchestra. I understand that they hail from New York and they brought a bit of East Coast style with them. The old fogey in me really appreciated the vintage vibe they projected. Their polished aura goes well with their color coordination and their lovely harmonies.

Since I’m awful with these things, I cannot fully describe or classify their music; their set  simply reminded me of many beautiful things. That may be beastly unhelpful, so here’s their official YouTube channel instead. Please lend them your ears and listen well.

Series Review: Pride and Prejudice (1995)

Series Review: Pride and Prejudice (1995)

A slightly different version of this post first appeared on my old blog on November 13, 2008.

 

I just finished watching the BBC mini-series version of Pride and Prejudice (1995). I borrowed it from Paul, who shares my passion for Jane Austen. Is anyone else interested in watching Colin Firth go all ga-ga over Jennifer Ehle? Damn, the eye sex between Darcy and Elizabeth Bennet was so intense I thought my laptop was going to burst into flames.

Jennifer Erhe and Colin Firth, ignoring each other. A BBC image.

So did I enjoy it? Yeah. Is it better than the others? Hmm. Read on.

It’s not the first adaptation of Pride and Prejudice I’ve seen, of course. I first read the novel in grade six and I’m a rather jaded Janeite. I already had high expectations since the hardcore fans at the Republic of Pemberley seem to like this version best.

I knew it had to be better than the 1940 film version starring Laurence Olivier. *heavy shudders* Oh, that godawful tripe! The story was highly compressed, the era was completely wrong—damn it, Elizabeth shouldn’t be wearing Victorian hoops!—and all the Bennet sisters get husbands in a patchy ending. Ugh.

What I found adorable about this version was its fidelity to the text. It devoted many scenes to Wickham’s friendship with Elizabeth, which is hardly touched upon in the 2005 film version starring Keira Knightley. It was great in delineating Lydia’s unconscious descent into folly, and it took great pains to show Elizabeth’s relationship with her eccentric father and her friendship with the Gardiners. (In Patricia Meyer Spacks’s The Female Imagination, she mentions that the Gardiners are the only stable, mature relationship in the novel. So I find it nice to see them portrayed decently. They are usually reduced to bit parts.)

And Mr. Darcy. Oh, Mr. Darcy. No wonder Bridget Jones’s Diary was written. I wonder if Jane Austen would have wanted so much screen time spent on her most famous male lead. The script pandered to its female audience by devoting many scenes to Colin Firth’s Mr. Darcy, trying to shed light on the hidden aspects of his character. Fencing practice? Check. Swimming half-naked? Check. Strange flashbacks where he shows up in Elizabeth’s mirrors? Check. I found the last bit a little too much for my taste. I’d love to marry Mr. Darcy myself, but no ghostly apparitions, please. Matthew Macfadyen may be the most yummy Mr. Darcy, but Colin Firth is more… combustible?

And a word on Mr. Collins. Oh God. That has to be the creepiest Mr. Collins I’ve ever encountered! It was not just his ugly comb-over either—it was the combination of pompous buffoonery and lecherous glares. It was like a strange mixture of Wormtail and Padre Salvi.

I didn’t watch this to compare versions but it’s almost impossible not to do so. If you ask me how much better I like it better than the 2005 film version, I’m going to hem and haw about it. The Janes were both sweetly angelic, the Lady Katherines were both menacing, and the Marys and Kittys all ridiculous in their own ways.

It’s difficult to say which version is superior. Both adaptations wanted to go to completely different places in the audience’s mind. The 2005 film captured the romance and imagination of Elizabeth Bennet’s wit, humor, and self-doubt. I loved the film for strange things, like Elizabeth’s swing being kept near the pigs and, oh dear, Mr. Darcy drenched in the rain, and Mr. Bingley’s awkwardly endearing proposal…

But the 1995 miniseries has so many good moments, too. Maybe it all boils down to how much time you have? If you only have a passing interest in Jane Austen and two hours to spare, I suggest the Keira Knightley film. If you’re a bit more patient and want to know exactly why Colin Firth has a huge female fan base, the miniseries is the place to start. It’s debatable whether he’s the definitive Mr. Darcy, but he sure does has a pair of fine eyes.

“Blogs get people into trouble.”

“Blogs get people into trouble.”

Greetings and salutations.

Ten years ago, I had my first blog over at Diaryland. (Don’t laugh.) It was partly political in nature and it got me into a bit of trouble. After a year I deleted it. My new motto became “blogs get people into trouble.”

The lesson was not well-learned, however, and five years later I started another blog over at Multiply. Most of my friends used that site and I was feeling left out. (Yes, Multiply. It was 2007, after all.) I didn’t get into any trouble over there and I actually enjoyed myself.

It’s 2012 now. A lot of social media sites have come and gone, and I’m looking for something more permanent. Since recycling is good, I’m re-using my old blog name for WordPress purposes. There’s nothing like having a bit of continuity, right?

In case you’re wondering why I’m attached to such a silly user name, my sister Auey gave “Lucky Parking Girl” to me years ago. She used to call it my secret superhero identity. When we lived in Manila, she swore she found the best parking spaces when I was in the passenger seat. Like all super powers, it also has a weakness: it doesn’t work when I’m the one driving.

Arguably, it is the second most useless super power in the world.